This is a hell of a story

Written by
William Gibson in 1984

I’d heard of Neuromancer and how it was a classic piece of science fiction. Never really knew just how influencial it was until I read it. Now I really understand the foresight William Gibson had when writing this.

The story begins with Case, a hacker who’s down on his luck, because he betrayed his former employers, who in turn damaged his nervous system, meaning he can no longer hack. Instead, he’s become a hustler in black market parts to feed his drug addiction.

He’s “volunteered” into a job by a mysterious man named Armitage, and a cybernetically enhanced woman named Molly. Armitage cures the damage done to Case’s nervous system so that he can once again enter the matrix and use his hacking skills for one ultimate job.

I’m sure many people have read this book already, but it really is a grand adventure. I can see so many elements of modern cyberpunk fiction in this, from computer games like Deus Ex, to movies like The Matrix. Hell, even Microsoft gets a mention in here.

The world in Neuromancer is quite unlike the one we really live in. Written in 1984, before the fall of the Soviet Union, a hypothetical World War 3 between the west and the communist bloc defines a lot of the technology and setting. You can almost taste the neon glow of Japan, the poverty of Istanbul and experience the disorientation of zero gravity in space.

Neuromancer may not be the easiest book to digest, but it sure is well executed. It absolutely deserves the awards it has received.

Rating

Influential, exciting and immersive.

Read this if you…

Wonder where the Wachowskis got the idea for The Matrix

Don’t read this if you…

Can’t digest fast paced writing. This book really throws you into the deep end.

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